Cinderella Through the Years

Ballet Fantastique is doing it again… For the first time, we’re bringing back our inimitable, all-original rock opera ballet Cinderella, where the year is 1964, the ball is prom, and the dance moves are the Twist and the Mashed Potato…on pointe.  Straight from the imaginations of Ballet Fantastique mother-daughter producer-choreographers Donna and Hannah Bontrager (premiere 2012), BFan’s Cinderella is back at the Hult for its homecoming run!

For centuries this enchanting tale of a young peasant girl getting her dream come true of becoming a princess has inspired numerous adaptations. As we get ready to perform our own adaptation of the beloved classic we have looked back at some of the past takes on Cinderella. From the more widely known Walt Disney screen variation to one of the early French theatre adaptations, this story continues to capture the attention of audiences young and old for years to come.
For more information regarding the performance and to purchase tickets visit us at http://www.balletfantastique.org/company/event-cinderella.php

1810

One of the early adaptations of Cinderella was a French opera titled Cendrillon (Cinderella in French) by composer Nicolas Isouard. It was performed as an opera with spoken dialogue between numbers. It was first performed by the Opéra-Comique at the Salle Feydeau in Paris on February 22,1810 and was a success throughout Europe at the time.

1899

One of the early film adaptations is the 1899 film by Georges Melies, Cendrillon, which was based on the fairy tale by Charles Perrault. This version by Perrault is one of the more popular interpretations as it introduced the additions of the pumpkin, fairy-godmother, and the glass slipper into the story.

1950

This animated feature length musical by Walt Disney is one of the more iconic movie adaptations. Produced by Walt Disney in 1950, it is also based on the fairy-tale by Perrault. Some hit songs from the movie include “A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes” and “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo”.

1956

In 1956 Rogers and Hammerstein introduced a musical written for television version of the classic fairy-tale. It was originally broadcast live on CBS on March 31, 1957 and starred Julie Andrews as Cinderella. The broadcast was viewed by more than 100 million people.

1976

The Slipper and the Rose is a 1976 musical film of the Cinderella story by the Sherman Brothers. They were nominated for several awards following the musicals success.

1987

This Russian ballet was composed by Sergei Prokofiev and is considered one of his most popular and melodious compositions. It was composed between 1940 and 1944 and has been adapted by many ballets such as with this 1987 Russian ballet.

1998

In 1988 the classic inspired an American romantic comedy-drama titled Ever After directed by Andy Tennant and starring Drew Barrymore. It is adapted as a historical fiction story, set in early Renaissance era France and is often seen as a post modern feminism interpretation.

2008

The Paris Opera Ballet performed the 1987 version of Sergei Prokofiev’s ballet in 2008. It was adapted by choreographer Rudolf Nureyev to reflect the art deco style and temperament of the 1930s.

2013

The San Francisco Ballet performed an adaptation of Cinderella for their 2013/2014 season. Choreographed by the sought after Christopher Wheeldon it was hailed by the San Francisco Chronicle as “utterly alluring” and “ravishing.”

2015

The newest film adaptation of the classic fairy-tale comes again from Disney. Although not a direct remake, the film borrows many elements from Walt Disney’s 1950 animated musical film. It was released on March 13, 2015 and stars Lily James, Cate Blanchett, Helena Bonham Carter, among others.

http://purchase.tickets.com/buy/TicketPurchase?orgid=39749&schedule=list&group_id=483440

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